How the internet is helping head start conversations around asexuality

How the Internet Can Help Conversation Around Asexuality

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For Dr. Singh, it was GoDaddy; for Charles, it was Facebook; for Manuel, it was Instagram—the internet was a common factor in all of these stories Broad community dialogue about sexual orientation.

Social media, as a platform, is a great place to meet new people, try new things, and find new places to explore. But most importantly, it’s also a haven for people seeking acceptance and wanting to be surrounded by groups that understand them.

In 2014, Dr Pragati Singh volunteered to help these people, bringing them together to form a community. The LGBTQIA+ conversation in India is so quiet that Dr. Singh founded Indian Aces. What started as a closed Facebook group has grown into an award-winning, funded, volunteer-led initiative with online and offline events across India.

According to Statista, only 2% of people in India identify as asexual — a very low number for a country so densely populated. Asexuality is a sexual orientation, usually defined as a lack of sexual attraction to others, or a low or lack of interest or desire for sexual activity. For a country obsessed with marriage, acceptance, and even understanding, asexuality can be difficult, and that’s where Dr. Singer’s movement helps build a community that accepts and grows.

Dr. Singh, who comes from a medical background, knew she wanted to help drive the conversation, but she didn’t know how. She was introduced to GoDaddy, a web hosting company that helped her build the website from scratch – everything her own – and the rest is history. “The website that runs today, led by the entire team, still uses the original domain name from 2014,” she said.

While self-proclaimed “aces” in the community want a warm welcome, they also don’t want to be identified as kings, so why?

Another sister program of Indian Aces is Humans of Queer, a Pride Month project that showcases the life stories of people from the LGBTQIA+ community. Bhavesh Arora, hotelier at Gurugram, wrote: “I thought I was afraid of sex at first. But after spending hours researching asexuality on the internet, I understood that I am an asexual…I thought I was ‘no’ It’s normal’, but after finding the asexual community, I learned that there are many others like me.”

When people find themselves different from the general norm, they often feel out of place, or, as Arora puts it, “abnormal.” last year, BBC Interviewed Anahí Charles from Mexico to learn about asexuality, and Charles expressed similar feelings. She said she “denies” not being sexually attracted to anyone. She even went to the hospital to check herself for any problems. Facebook saved her, and this is where she first discovered asexuality and realized how much she could relate to it. A year later, she became the moderator of an asexual Facebook group in Mexico.

Marisa Manuel from America is another name BBC quotation marks. When she first heard about asexuality in high school, she was misunderstood that Trump wanted to be alone, while she liked being with people.

“Manuel is trying to add to this growing pool of representation. Ahead of International Asexuality Day, she created AceChat, an Instagram account where she regularly shares stories from ace people of different identities. It has gained positive traction welcome, she keeps getting letters from people who want to tell their stories. There are now about 100 people involved,” the BBC article added.

For Dr. Singh, it was GoDaddy; for Charles, it was Facebook; for Manuel, it was Instagram—the internet was a common factor in all of these stories Broad community dialogue about sexual orientation. Technology has big breakthroughs every day, but it’s also part of those small victories that can impact lives every day.

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